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Limited Bankroll…Obstacle or Opportunity

The interesting thing about most people who consider themselves to be "$5 players", is the fact that their total action per-hand is often far above that $5 mark...but their net-profit per-hand is almost always far below what their current D-I shooting-skills deserve to win.

Why is that?

Because they think their current bankroll restricts their ability to make 'real money' with the limited resources they've got to work with.

Sure, a limited bankroll does restricts the bet-flexibility of a skilled shooter; but frankly, profitable advantage-play has more to do with HOW you USE what you've got than just the limitation of a modest bankroll itself.

Let me explain:

When you look at that chart for "Expected Net-Profit per-hand for a $5 Field-bet" above, and see that a SRR-7 X-6 shooter will make a net-profit of about $6.81 per-hand on a triple-pay-12 table (or an average of about $6.46 per-hand on a double-pay-12 table) for a measly $5 bet; you quickly realize that the Field-Harvest offers the SRR-7 shooter an average 136% return-on-investment/per-hand.

If you compare that ROI to what the same shooter would make off of let's say, $22-Inside or $20-Outside, the revenue-building opportunities offered by the Field-Harvest's more-than-100% ROI/per-hand start to give the term "bankroll growth" a whole new meaning.

That is, if the same SRR-7 shooter isn't averaging a net-profit of $27 to $30 per-hand from his $22-Inside or $20-Outside bets as he would be if he was making $20 or $22 flat Field-Harvest bets; then he should at least examine why he is settling for a lower return-on-investment and lower bankroll growth when neither his current shooting-skills nor his limited bankroll really requires him to.

Here's a pretty simple exercise:

~Add up all of your non PL w/Odds point-cycle wagers. Those are all of the Place-bets, Come-bets w/Odds, Put-bets, Hardways, Horn's, World's, C&E's, and Hop-bets that you make once the Point is established.

~Come up with an honest average amount that is spent on non PL w/Odds point-cycle wagers. Let's say this SRR-7 shooter usually bets $22-Inside, plus $4 in Hardways, and a $4-Horn at least once a hand. That's $30 in total non PL w/Odds point-cycle wagers per hand.

~Let's say that on average he makes a net-profit of around $10 per-hand off of those non PL w/Odds point-cycle wagers.

~Now divide his average net-profit of $10 per hand into his non PL w/Odds point-cycle wager/investment of $30 and multiply it by 100.

~That gives you his average return-on-investment per hand. In this case, the SRR-7 shooter earns an average ROI of 33.33% per hand. Not too shabby, but can his current D-I skills earn him more net-profit from the same amount of non PL w/Odds point-cycle money?

~If he was flat-betting the same $30 of non PL w/Odds point-cycle money on the Field-Harvest ; he'd be averaging a net-profit of around $40.80 per hand.

Sure, an average profit of $10 per hand is good, but an average profit of $40 per hand from exactly the same skill-set and exactly the same amount of non PL w/Odds point-cycle money is, to my mind, a little bit better.

Again, it's HOW a modestly skilled dice-influencer USES his limited bankroll that determines whether it continues to be an obstacle or a highly productive opportunity.

Good Luck and Good Skill at the tables...and in Life.

The Mad Professor

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on February 8, 2007 11:00 AM.

The previous post in this blog was Being An Advantage-Player Starts with Knowing What Your Real-World Advantage Is.

The next post in this blog is The Match-Play Coupon Circuit - Part 1.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.

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