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Conquering Ultra Bouncy Tables - Part 2

The Grip
The dice-grip that you choose for the ULTRA LS&E toss doesn’t really matter as much as the evenness and balance of the release itself.

When dealing with super-bouncy tables; the height at which you release the dice, the amount of spin that you impart at the point-of-release, the descent-trajectory angle that they first impact the table with, and the target-area at which they are thrown to, is what makes all the difference between a highly-reliable outcome…and a truly horrific looking random result.

Now that’s not to say that your grip doesn’t matter.

Rather, it just means that your basic grip, no matter which one you use; will usually suffice if it already delivers pretty consistent results on traditional layouts. On the other hand, if your grip is lousy to begin with and you are getting inconsistent results on normal tables; then it ain’t gonna magically cure itself and turn you into a golden arm of proficiency when you audition it on a bouncy table.


Components of Victory

As I mentioned a moment ago, the height at which you release the dice, the amount of spin that you impart, the descent-trajectory angle that the dice first impact the table with, and the target-area at which they are thrown to; is what makes all the difference on trampoline tables.

Those four elements are the keystone components of victory in terms of conquering this type of table.

Here’s why:

The flatness of the cubes flight-path in a very low, very flat parabolic trajectory is a critical part of the bouncy-table solution, as is the maximal-reduction (in absolute terms) of the amount of release-energy that you expend when the dice are released from your hand.

If it can be said that my now-conventional Low, Slow, and Easy Toss uses the least amount of throwing-speed and release-point height amongst the “traditional” D-I tosses; then it can be said that my ULTRA LS&E uses about 40% to 50% lessof each of those directional inputs.


The Throw
My conventional Low, Slow & Easy Toss is released about 6 to 8 inches above the table surface, but by the time you fully extend your arm in its follow-through motion, the dice are only about 4 to 5 inches off of the felt. That means that they are sent on their way in a relatively flat downward trajectory towards their initial touch down target.

On the other hand…

My newly-refined ULTRA Low, Slow & Easy Toss is released about 4 to 6 inches above the table surface, but by the time you fully extend your arm in its follow-through motion, the dice are only about 2 to 3 inches off of the felt. That means that they are sent on their way in an even flatter trajectory towards their initial touch-down target.

Please note that the dice are not BOWLED or ROLLED down the table. They are THROWN in a flat-trajectory to the initial target-area.

That means that there is very little descent-energy and therefore, very little opportunity for the high-density closed-cell foam underlayment to impart a high degree of jounce or rebound, and so the dice are more likely to continue on towards the backwall in an undisturbed on-axis facially-correlated manner.

The LEAST opportunity you give to the HDCC material to disturb the initial touch-down in any way, the better your chances of a high consistency outcome.

In other words, you have to minimize the rebound shock that the dice initially encounter on their first impact with the table in order to maximize their continued axial integrity.

The less energy and the less undissipated descent-speed that the dice impact the table with; the more likely they are to end up with a result that we intend instead of the random rebound hopping, popping, and scattering that high-density closed-cell foam normally inspires.

We'll look at this further in Part Three.

Until then,

Good Luck and Good Skill at the Tables…and in Life.

The Mad Professor

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on August 12, 2008 4:00 PM.

The previous post in this blog was Conquering Ultra Bouncy Tables - Part 1.

The next post in this blog is Conquering Ultra Bouncy Tables Part - 4.

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